Volume 9-14 (2020-26)

v9i2239v9i2.239
ISSN: 1800-427X (printed)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v9i2.239

Submitted date: 12 June 2020
Accepted date: 30 September 2020
Published date: 28 November 2020
Pp. 232–236, Pls. 65–66.

Lesser large-footed Bat (Myotis hasseltii) from Southwest Sri Lanka

G. Edirisinghe*, D. Gabadage, M. Botejue, D. Dissanayake, P. Chandika & T. Surasinghe
*Corresponding author. E-mail: gayan.yza@gmail.com

The Lesser large-footed bat, Myotis hasseltii, is distributed in Sri Lanka, India (West Bengal) and Southeast Asia including Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, VietNam, Peninsular Malaysia, Indonesia, and China. Although the Global Red List of IUCN categorized this species as of Least Concern, the National Red List of Sri Lanka lists it as Near Threatened. Myotis hasseltii is a relatively rare bat species in Sri Lanka, and has a patchy distribution there with the few previous locality records coming from the northern, eastern and southern parts of the dry zone of the island. Earlier records of this species are from Anuradhapura, Kappachchi, Kokoputchi, Valaichchenai and Yala National Park, Minipe Canal near Randenigala and Thelgamuwa Oya near Illukkumbura in the Knuckles region. Here, we provide the first record of M. hasseltii from the Southwestern wet zone of Sri Lanka (Sabaragamuwa Province).

Section Editor: Burton Lim
v9i2238v9i2.238
ISSN: 1800-427X (printed)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v9i2.238

Submitted date: 5 March 2020
Accepted date: 12 June 2020
Published date: 28 November 2020
Pp. 227–231, Pl. 64.

Round-eared tube-nosed bat (Murina cyclotis) from Southwest Sri Lanka

G. Edirisinghe*, D. Gabadage, M. Botejue, P. Chandika & T. Surasinghe
*Corresponding author. E-mail: gayan.yza@gmail.com

Vesper bats (Family Vespertilionidae) are the most diverse bat family in Sri Lanka, represented by 12 species. The round-eared tube-nosed bat, Murina cyclotis is one of the rarest vesper bats. The species is distributed in South and Southeast Asia, and it belongs to a cryptic species complex. The distribution range of M. cyclotis is patchy and in Sri Lanka it is known only from a few localities. Given its widespread range, it is listed as Least Concern in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, whereas the National Conservation Assessments of Sri Lanka listed M. cyclotis as Near Threatened (NT). Here, we provide a new site record for this species from southwestern Sri Lanka.

Section Editor: Burton Lim
v9i2237v9i2.237
ISSN: 1800-427X (printed)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v9i2.237

Submitted date: 9 July 2020
Accepted date: 10 October 2020
Published date: 28 November 2020
Pp. 225–226, Pl. 63.

On a bent-toed gecko (Cyrtodactylus sp.) from south-eastern Bali, Indonesia

Matthew Mo* & Elouise Mo
*Corresponding author. E-mail: matthew.sk.mo@gmail.com

The bent-toed gecko genus Cyrtodactylus is a highly diverse reptile genus, well represented across Southeast Asia, as well as the Indian subcontinent and Australia. Cyrtodactylus species are widely distributed throughout the Indonesian archipelago and recently a new species, C. jatnai was identified from West Bali. A previous herpetofaunal inventory of Bali only listed C. fumosus as the sole representative of the genus. More recently, determined that the name C. fumosus refers to a species endemic to Sulawesi and that records elsewhere represent misidentifications and the identity of records from Bali consequently clarified. A recent study of reptile assemblages in the Gianyar Regency (south-eastern Bali) reported the marbled bow-fingered gecko C. marmoratus, a species found in Java and assumed to occur in Bali. Following the recent description of C. jatnai, the only species of Cyrtodactylus so far confirmed to occur on Bali, detailed morphological study is required to determine whether C. marmoratus is genuinely present on the island.

Section Editor: Thasun Amarasinghe
v9i2236v9i2.236
ISSN: 1800-427X (printed)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v9i2.236

Submitted date: 13 September 2020
Accepted date: 31 October 2020
Published date: 28 November 2020
Pp. 222–224, Pls. 61–62.

Distribution of two endemic bufonids (Anura: Bufonidae) in the Western Ghats

S.R. Chandramouli*
*E-mail: findthesnakeman@gmail.com

The Anuran family Bufonidae Gray, 1825 is represented by four genera in peninsular India: Duttaphrynus; Xanthophryne; Ghatophryne; and Pedostibes. Of these, the three latter genera are endemic to the Western Ghats. These endemic bufonid genera are represented by two, two and one species respectively. Though the distribution patterns of these endemic toads have been documented in the past, precise published records are few. Reddy et al. (2002) reported a range extension of G. ornata from Kudremukh. The distribution of P. tuberculosus was mapped by Dinesh & Radhakrishnan (2008). Likewise, Subramanian et al. (2013) presented a point distribution map for G. ornata and G. rubigina. However, further precise distribution records of these endemic taxa are still in need of a proper appraisal. In this paper, I present point maps of the distributions of G. ornata and P. tuberculosus and reassess their conservation status based on the IUCN criteria.

Section Editor: Philip Bowles
v9i2235v9i2.235
ISSN: 1800-427X (printed)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v9i2.235

Submitted date: 25 June 2020
Accepted date: 31 October 2020
Published date: 28 November 2020
Pp. 220–221, Pl. 60.

Limnonectes macrodon (Duméril & Bibron, 1841) from Bali, Indonesia

Petr Sramek & Ruchira Somaweera*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: ruchira.somaweera@gmail.com

The Giant Javan Frog, Limnonectes macrodon (Duméril & Bibron, 1841), is a large dicroglossid with adult males reaching up to 15 cm SVL. This species was previously thought to be widespread in Southeast Asia, but taxonomic studies have spilt the taxon into multiple species, with L. macrodon now considered to be restricted to Java and to Lampung province in South Sumatra. Accordingly, numerous records from elsewhere are now considered either to belong to other taxa or need further verification. For example, those records from the Malay Peninsula and from the mainland of Southeast Asia are now referrable to L. blythii, whereas those from Borneo are referrable to L. ingeri. The record from Sikkim in northeastern India is almost certainly in error, whereas another record for Manipur in northeastern India is yet to be verified. Similarly, those from New Guinea also need further investigation and a record from the Andaman Islands in India likely belongs to an as yet undescribed species.

Section Editor: Thasun Amarasinghe
Hubungi Kami
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