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v7i3186v7i3.186
ISSN: 1800-427X (print)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
Alfred Russel Wallace Centenary Issue
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v7i3.186

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Alfred Russel Wallace and the Wallacea
Organised by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences
Wakatobi - Indonesia (10–13 November 2013)
J. Supriatna, A.A.T. Amarasinghe, and C. Margules (Editors)
Published date: 30 July 2015
Pp. 143–150, Pls. 5–7.

ISOLATION OF MARINE BACTERIA IN AMBON BAY WITH POTENTIAL BIOTECHNOLOGICAL FEATURES

Yosmina Tapilatu*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: yosmina.tapilatu@lipi.go.id

Abstract
Ambon Bay is situated in the Wallacea biogeographical area. Despite various studies on marine natural resources reported from this bay, limited information is available on marine bacteria that produce compounds with potential biotechnological applications. We report here preliminary results of our attempt to isolate bacteria of this group from Ambon Bay. Nine different isolates were obtained, but only eight indicated potential as producers of compounds with biotechnological potential. Two isolates indicated agarolytic bacteria characteristics, whereas one showed the properties of exopolysaccharide (EPS) producing bacteria. Three isolates produced various pigments. Two were identified tentatively as members of actinomycetes, a group known as a prolific producer of antimicrobial compounds. Preliminary identification of the cell morphologies of each isolate revealed the dominance of cocci-shaped bacteria. Most of them showed optimal growth in 1 to 7 days when incubated at 30°C. These results indicate that Ambon Bay waters and the surrounding area could harbour marine bacteria with potential features for biotechnological applications.

Key words : eastern Indonesia, marine bacteria, secondary metabolites, Wallacea marine area
v7i3185v7i3.185
ISSN: 1800-427X (print)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
Alfred Russel Wallace Centenary Issue
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v7i3.185

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Alfred Russel Wallace and the Wallacea
Organised by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences
Wakatobi - Indonesia (10–13 November 2013)
J. Supriatna, A.A.T. Amarasinghe, and C. Margules (Editors)
Published date: 30 July 2015
Pp. 131–142, Pls. 1–4.

MINING MICROBIAL SYMBIONTS FOR SPONGE-DERIVED NATURAL PRODUCTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE WALLACEA

Christine M. Theodore & Phillip Crews*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: pcrews@ucsc.edu

Abstract
The Indonesian Coral Triangle is a biodiversity hotspot bisected by the Wallace line. It is becoming clear that ecological and anthropogenic factors are impacting the region. Our research is focused on the biosynthetic products of sponges. These natural products, which are beneficial to human health, will be lost if biodiversity were to decrease. For decades, chemists have looked to marine sponges as a source of novel pharmaceuticals. Over time, there has been growing suspicion these metabolites may actually be produced by microbial symbionts. Herein, we discuss a brief history of sponge natural products chemistry. Sponge associated microorganisms and their likely role in the production of clinically relevant compounds are explored through three case studies. The potential intellectual and pharmaceutical impact locked within the sponges of the Indonesian Coral Triangle is immense. We conclude that conservation, protection and management of this resource are vital from an ecological and human health perspective.

Key words : Bacteria, bengamide, fijianolide, Indonesian Coral Triangle, psymberin, symbiosis
v7i3184v7i3.184
ISSN: 1800-427X (print)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
Alfred Russel Wallace Centenary Issue
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v7i3.184

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Alfred Russel Wallace and the Wallacea
Organised by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences
Wakatobi - Indonesia (10–13 November 2013)
J. Supriatna, A.A.T. Amarasinghe, and C. Margules (Editors)
Published date: 30 July 2015
Pp. 126–130.

HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH A MOLUCCAN WOODCOCK: EXPERIENCES OF A MODERN FIELD BIOLOGIST IN WALLACEA

John C. Mittermeier*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: john.mittermeier@gmail.com

Abstract
One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Russel Wallace visited the Malay Archipelago much still remains to be discovered about the fascinating species that inhabit the islands now known as Wallacea. While modern fieldwork brings opportunities, and a few difficulties, that Wallace himself would not have imagined, many of the challenges facing field biologists in the twenty-first century are the same as those experienced by Wallace himself. Here I describe the struggles and excitement of Wallacean fieldwork through our efforts to obtain the first photographs of an endangered bird species, the Moluccan Woodcock Scolopax rochussenii, on Obi Island in the Northern Moluccas.

Key words : endangered, field biologists, fieldwork, Northern Moluccas, Obi Island
v7i3183v7i3.183
ISSN: 1800-427X (print)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
Alfred Russel Wallace Centenary Issue
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v7i3.183

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Alfred Russel Wallace and the Wallacea
Organised by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences
Wakatobi - Indonesia (10–13 November 2013)
J. Supriatna, A.A.T. Amarasinghe, and C. Margules (Editors)
Published date: 30 July 2015
Pp. 120–125.

ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE AND NATURAL SELECTION: THE REAL STORY

George W. Beccaloni*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: g.beccaloni@nhm.ac.uk

Abstract
Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913) was a largely self-educated British naturalist, who co-published the theory of evolution by natural selection with Charles Darwin in 1858, fifteen months before Darwin’s book Origin of species was released. Some have suggested that Wallace’s independent discovery of natural selection in Indonesia in February of that year was merely fortuitous, but in fact it was the culmination of a concerted 10 year personal quest to understand how evolutionary change takes place. Although Wallace was showered with prestigious honours and awards for his great discovery, and in spite of the fact that he became one of the most famous people in the world towards the end of his life, his intellectual legacy was rapidly overshadowed by Charles Darwin’s after his death.

Key words : Charles Lyell, Joseph Hooker, Linnean Society, Malay Archipelago
v7i2166v7i2.166
ISSN: 1800-427X (print)
eISSN: 1800-427X (online)
DOI:10.47605/tapro.v7i2.166

Submitted date: 9 July 2014
Accepted date: 17 July 2014
Published date: 20 February 2015
Pp. 68–71, Pls. 1–2.

DISCOVERY OF THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED BULBOUS HERB Crinum woodrowii (AMARYLLIDACEAE) & ITS NEOTYPIFICATION

R. Kr. Singh* & Arti Garg
*Corresponding author. E-mail: rksbsiadsingh@yahoo.co.in

Abstract
A single population of a critically endangered species, Crinum woodrowii, was discovered from Katraj Ghat, Pune District, Maharashtra, at a location other than its type location. A neotype of the species is designated here and its detailed description, distribution, habitat, IUCN threat status, and nomenclatural notes are provided.

Key words : habitat, Katraj Ghat, Maharashtra, neotype, new locality, taxonomy

Section Editor: James L. Reveal
Hubungi Kami
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